Conceptual model of emergency department utilization among deaf and hard-of-hearing patients: A critical review

Figure 1, Conceptual model of emergency department utilization among deaf and hard-of-hearing patients. from James et al., International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Abstract

Deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) populations are understudied in health services research and underserved in healthcare systems. Existing data indicate that adult DHH patients are more likely to use the emergency department (ED) for less emergent conditions than non-DHH patients. However, the lack of research focused on this population’s ED utilization impedes the development of health promotion and quality improvement interventions to improve patient health and quality outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop a conceptual model describing patient and non-patient (e.g., community, health system, provider) factors influencing ED utilization and ED care processes among DHH people. We conducted a critical review and used Andersen’s Behavioral Model of Health Services Use and the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model to classify factors based on their theoretical and/or empirically described role. The resulting Conceptual Model of Emergency Department Utilization Among Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Patients provides predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors influencing DHH patient ED care seeking and ED care processes. The model highlights the abundance of DHH patient and non-DHH patient enabling factors. This model may be used in quality improvement interventions, health services research, or in organizational planning and policymaking to improve health outcomes for DHH patients.

Publication
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Disclosures

  • Is this paper peer reviewed? This paper is published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. This journal uses double-blind peer review, where the authors and the reviewers do not know each other’s identities.

  • Who paid for this project? This project was supported by grant number R36HS027537 from the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (PI: T.G.J.). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  • Are there any conflicts of interest? There are no conflicts of interest.

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